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African American History

American History

  • A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation @ Library of Congress
    Beginning with the Continental Congress in 1774, America's national legislative bodies have kept records of their proceedings. The records of the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention, and the United States Congress make up a rich documentary history of the construction of the nation and the development of the federal government and its role in the national life. These documents record American history in the words of those who built our government.
  • American Memory @ Library of Congress
  • American State Papers @ Library of Congress
    The American State Papers, comprising a total of thirty-eight physical volumes, contain the legislative and executive documents of Congress during the period 1789 to 1838. The collection includes documents that cover the critical historical gap from 1789 to the printing of the first volume of the U.S. Serial Set in 1817.
  • Democratic National Political Conventions 1832 - 2008
    The Democratic convention of 1832, held on May 21 - 22 in Baltimore, is notable as the convention where the Democratic Party formally adopted its present name. The party had previously been known as “Republican Delegates from the Several States.” The convention nominated President Andrew Jackson for a second term and nominated Martin Van Buren of New York for vice president.
  • Diplomat History @ State Department
  • FBI History
    On July 26, 2008, the FBI celebrated its 100th anniversary as an intelligence agency and national security organization and a century of service to the American people.
  • Historical Publications of the United States Commission on Civil Rights
    Since its inception in 1957, the United States Commission on Civil Rights has been at the forefront of efforts by the Federal Government and state governments to examine and resolve issues related to race, ethnicity, religion and, more recently, sexual orientation.
  • History, Arts and Culture @ USA.gov
  • Legislative Source Book @ the Law Librarians' Society of Washington D.C.
  • NASA History Division
  • NASA History Division
    Since its inception in 1958, NASA has accomplished many great scientific and technological feats in air and space. NASA technology also has been adapted for many nonaerospace uses by the private sector.
  • National Register of Historic Places
  • Naval History and Heritage
    Whether you visit one of the twelve official U.S. Navy Museums, take advantage of public programs and publications, or seek knowledge through the artifacts, documents, images and artwork available at the NHHC, you will find that this is where the history, legacy and traditions of the United States Navy come alive.
  • Office of History @ National Institute of Health
    The Office of History, National Institutes of Health exists to advance historical understanding of biomedical research within the NIH and the world. Through preserving records of significant NIH achievements, innovative exhibits, educational programs, and training researchers from multiple disciplines, the Office of History explores the past to enhance present understanding of the health sciences and the NIH.
  • Office of the Historian @ U.S. Department of State
  • Outline of U.S. History
    A chronological look at how the United States took shape -- from its origins as an obscure set of colonies on the Atlantic coast a little more than 200 years ago into what one political analyst today calls "the first universal nation." This fully illustrated edition has been completely revised and updated by Alonzo L. Hamby, Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio University.
  • Prologue Magazine, created by the National Archives
    Prologue magazine brings readers stories based on the rich holdings and programs of the National Archives across the nation—from Washington, DC, to the regional archives and the Presidential libraries.
  • Republican National Political Conventions 1856-2008
    The first Republican convention was held June 17 - 19, 1856 in Philadelphia amid a growing sense in the nation that civil war was inevitable. The Republican Party was formed two years earlier in response to the increasing importance of the slavery issue and its opposition to slavery’s expansion. This new party nominated John C. Fremont of California for president.
  • The Formation of Political Parties @ National Archives
  • The National Archives
  • The National Archives Experience
  • The Political Graveyard
    The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography,or, The Web Site That Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried
  • The United States Statutes at Large
    The United States Statutes at Large, commonly referred to as the Statutes at Large, is the official source for the laws and resolutions passed by Congress. Publication began in 1845 by the private firm of Little, Brown and Company under authority granted by a joint resolution of Congress. In 1874, Congress transferred the authority to publish the Statutes at Large to the Government Printing Office, which has been responsible for producing the set since that time.
  • The Valley of the Shadow : two communities in the American Civil War
  • U.S. Army Center of Military History
  • United States Serial Set @ Library of Congress
    The United States Congressional Serial Set, commonly referred to as the Serial Set, began publication with the 15th Congress, 1st Session (1817). Documents before 1817 may be found in the American State Papers.
  • Veterans History Project @ Library of Congress
  • Women's History Month @ Library of Congress
    The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of women whose commitment to nature and the planet have proved invaluable to society.

Census

Civil War

  • A brief Naval Chronology of the Civil War (1861-65)
  • A brief Naval Chronology of the Civil War (1861-65) @ Naval Historical Center
  • A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation @ Library of Congress
    Beginning with the Continental Congress in 1774, America's national legislative bodies have kept records of their proceedings. The records of the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention, and the United States Congress make up a rich documentary history of the construction of the nation and the development of the federal government and its role in the national life. These documents record American history in the words of those who built our government.
  • Abraham Lincoln A Resource Guide @ Library of Congress
    The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material associated with Abraham Lincoln, including the complete Abraham Lincoln Papers from the Manuscript Division.
  • Black Soldiers in the Civil War @ Library of Congress
    The issues of emancipation and military service were intertwined from the onset of the Civil War. News from Fort Sumter set off a rush by free black men to enlist in U.S. military units.
  • Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877 @ Library of Congress
  • Civil War Battle Summaries by State
    Battle names appearing in blue denote a Union victory; butternut denotes a Confederate victory; green denotes an indecisive action. State names link to maps showing battlefield locations by county.
  • Civil War Battle Summaries by State
    Battle names appearing in blue denote a Union victory; butternut denotes a Confederate victory; green denotes an indecisive action.
    State names link to maps showing battlefield locations by county.
  • Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients @ U.S. Army Center of Military History
  • Civil War Records @ National Archives
  • Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System @ NPS
    This database serves as a starting point for relatives and researchers as they begin to piece together individual experiences of participants in this watershed event in American history. It documents the service and the lives of people of African descent who served in the U.S. Navy.
  • Document for July 18th: Casualty List of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment from the Assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, 07/18/1863
    The 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment was one of the most celebrated regiments of black soldiers that fought in the Civil War. Known simply as "the 54th," this regiment became famous after the heroic, but ill-fated, assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina in July, 1863. Leading the direct assault under heavy fire, the 54th suffered enormous casualties before being forced to withdraw.
  • Gettysburg National Military Park @ NPS
    The Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the Civil War, the Union victory in the summer of 1863 that ended General Robert E. Lee's second and most ambitious invasion of the North. Often referred to as the "High Water Mark of the Rebellion", it was the war's bloodiest battle with 51,000 casualties. It also provided President Abraham Lincoln with the setting for his most famous address.
  • History of African Americans in the Civil War @ NPS
    Approximately 180,000 African Americans comprising 163 units served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and many more African Americans served in the Union Navy. Both free African-Americans and runaway slaves joined the fight.
  • History of Mapping the Civil War @ Library of Congress
    War, like necessity, has been called the mother of invention. The same might be said of cartography, for with every war there is a great rush to produce maps to aid in understanding the nature of the land over which armies will move and fight, to plan engagements and the deployment of troops, and to record victories for posterity to study and admire. The American Civil War is a classic example of the effect that war has had on cartography
  • Intelligence in the Civil War @ CIA
  • Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 U.S. Serial Set, Numbers 4610 to 4616
    The Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 was printed in a seven-volume set between 1904 and 1905 as Senate Document No. 234 of the U.S. Serial Set, 58th Congress, 2nd session. A Senate Resolution dated January 28, 1904, directed the secretary of war, Elihu Root, to transmit to the U.S. Senate a copy of the Journal of the Provisional Congress and of the 1st and 2nd Congresses of the Confederate States of America.
  • Lincoln's Nomination of Grant @ National Archives
    The secession of eleven Southern states in 1861 plunged the nation into Civil War pitting the Confederate states against the Union. Nearly three years later the war raged on with no end in sight. President Abraham Lincoln and Congress, frustrated by the failures of their military leaders, needed to find a commander who could lead the Union to victory.
  • National Park Service Civil War Website
    The approaching 150th Anniversary of the American Civil War (2011-2015) offers the current generation of Americans a most important opportunity to know, discuss, and commemorate this country's greatest national crisis, while at the same time exploring its enduring relevance in the 21st century.
  • Research in Military Records: Civil War
  • Selected Civil War Photographs @ Library of Congress
    The Selected Civil War Photographs Collection contains 1,118 photographs. Most of the images were made under the supervision of Mathew B. Brady, and include scenes of military personnel, preparations for battle, and battle after-effects. The collection also includes portraits of both Confederate and Union officers, and a selection of enlisted men.
  • Selected Civil War Photographs @ Library of Congress
    The Selected Civil War Photographs Collection contains 1,118 photographs. Most of the images were made under the supervision of Mathew B. Brady, and include scenes of military personnel, preparations for battle, and battle after-effects. The collection also includes portraits of both Confederate and Union officers, and a selection of enlisted men.
  • The Hotchkiss Map Collection @ LOC
    The Hotchkiss Map Collection contains cartographic items made by Major Jedediah Hotchkiss (1828-1899), a topographic engineer in the Confederate Army. Hotchkiss made detailed battle maps primarily of the Shenandoah Valley, some of which were used by the Generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson for their combat planning and strategy.
  • The War of the Rebellion : a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate Armies
    Contains the formal reports, both Union and Confederate, of the first seizures of United States property in the Southern States, and of all military operations in the field, with the correspondence, orders, and returns relating specially thereto, and, as proposed is to be accompanied by an Atlas.
  • U.S. Civil War: Selected Resources @ LOC
    This guide is a compilation of many of the Civil War resources at the Library of Congress, along with links to selected resources outside the Library. The resources are organized by format. The purpose of this guide is to present researchers with selected sources through which they can begin and expand their scope of study of the American Civil War. It is not meant to serve as an exhaustive source for Civil War sources accessible through the Library of Congress.
  • Vicksburg National Military Park @ NPS
    The park commemorates the campaign, siege, and defense of Vicksburg. The city's surrender on July 4, 1863, along with the capture of Port Hudson, LA, on July 8, split the South, giving control of the Mississippi River to the Union. Over 1,340 monuments, a restored Union gunboat, and National Cemetery mark the 16-mile tour road.

Colonial History

  • A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation @ Library of Congress
    Beginning with the Continental Congress in 1774, America's national legislative bodies have kept records of their proceedings. The records of the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention, and the United States Congress make up a rich documentary history of the construction of the nation and the development of the federal government and its role in the national life. These documents record American history in the words of those who built our government.
  • American State Papers @ Library of Congress
    The American State Papers, comprising a total of thirty-eight physical volumes, contain the legislative and executive documents of Congress during the period 1789 to 1838. The collection includes documents that cover the critical historical gap from 1789 to the printing of the first volume of the U.S. Serial Set in 1817.
  • Colonial Fashion
    While 17th-century colonial dress was influenced by the fashionably excessive European styles of the time, New England Puritans viewed the flamboyant fashion as disorderly. The court established sumptuary laws to enforce a modest and conservative style of dress among all inhabitants of the colony. Archaeologists found evidence of colonial fashion through items unearthed such as a piece of a comb made of bone and copper shoe buckles.
  • Pictorial Americana Settlement and Colonial Life @ Library of Congress
  • The George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress
    Time Line: The Colonial Period
  • The Writings of George Washington @ The University of Virginia
    The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources 1745-1799 Edited by John C. Fitzpatrick (1931-44)

Presidental History & Libraries

World War I

World War II

  • Navajo Code Talkers: World War II Fact Sheet
    Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Peleliu, Iwo Jima: the Navajo code talkers took part in every assault the U.S. Marines conducted in the Pacific from 1942 to 1945. They served in all six Marine divisions, Marine Raider battalions and Marine parachute units, transmitting messages by telephone and radio in their native language a code that the Japanese never broke.
  • Pearl Harbor Raid, 7 December 1941 Overview and Special Image Selection
    The 7 December 1941 Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor was one of the great defining moments in history. A single carefully-planned and well-executed stroke removed the United States Navy's battleship force as a possible threat to the Japanese Empire's southward expansion. America, unprepared and now considerably weakened, was abruptly brought into the Second World War as a full combatant.
  • Pictures of WW II @ National Archives
    The Second World War was documented on a huge scale by thousands of photographers and artists who created millions of pictures. American military photographers representing all of the armed services covered the battlefronts around the world.

Government Documents

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